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Lily Allen reveals her husband David Harbor checks her phone (and vice versa)

The singer, like her husband, uses a cell phone subject to parental control. According to Lily Allen, this mode of operation is a way to combat smartphone addiction. An approach that raises questions, due to its strong resonance with certain practices of domestic cyberviolence.

In an interview given to Sunday times British singer Lily Allen explained on Sunday (May 26) that she and her husband monitor each other’s apps for each other’s downloads on their phones. The couple would use the brand’s cell phones Pinwheelintended for children and therefore entirely subject to parental control.

A practice that trivializes cyberviolence?

“The Pinwheel phone doesn’t let you surf the internet or access social networks, but you can use Uber and Spotify”he explained to the British newspaper. “My husband is the intended parent, so he controls what apps I can have on my phone. And I’m the phone parent of him.”

According to the singer, the choice to have a phone subject to parental control is motivated by the desire to protect oneself from a certain hyperconnectivity. “The creative side of my brain has been destroyed by smartphones. I feel like everyone feels the same way.”she added. “I don’t know anyone who can say that the quality of their life is improved by the presence of a smartphone. I think it destroyed us as a species. It’s horrible that they are designed to be so addictive. Some of us have more compelling personalities than others. It’s evil. »


However, this mode of operation raises questions. If in the specific case it arises from the desire to reduce the time spent on social networks, control of one's partner's phone can represent a lever for domestic cyberviolence. In 2018, a study – the first of its kind – conducted on 302 women victims of domestic violence and conducted by the Hubertine Auclert Center concluded that 9 out of 10 women victims of domestic violence also experience a form of cybercontrol. The fact of "searching for text messages, emails and apps" also appears in the violenceometer, a barometer that allows you to identify violent behavior within the couple.

Domestic violence: resources

If you or someone you know is a victim of domestic violence, or if you simply want to learn more about the topic:

  • 3919 and the government website Let's stop THE violence
  • Our practical article My boyfriend hit me: how to react, what to do when you are a victim of violence in your relationship?
  • The association Forward and its help chat available on How do we love each other?

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Source: Madmoizelle

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